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    It’s good smoked, straight up on the grill with a little lemon and butter, or rolled into sushi. And now, thanks to researchers at Taiwan’s Tsing Hua University and the…

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    The world’s smallest magnetic data storage unit is made of just 12 atoms, squeezing an entire byte into just 96 atoms, a significant shrinkage in the world of information…

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    An international team of researchers claims to have figured out a way to use ultrafast bursts of heat, rather than the typical magnetic field, to record a bit of information on a hard drive--a development they say could vastly increase the efficiency and speed of hard drives. They say it could record multiple terabytes per second, hundreds of times faster than current methods.

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    DNA is the blueprint for life, and now it can serve as a computer to monitor life’s processes. Bioengineers transformed DNA into a one-bit memory system that can record, store and erase data within living cells. A future DNA memory device could be used to track cell division and differentiation in cancer patients, perhaps, or to monitor what happens as cells get sick or age.

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    Despite claims to the contrary, the storage media in wide use today—CD-ROMs, spinning hard drives, flash memory, etc.—aren’t very durable. “You’re talking years, not…

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    A DNA strand

    Stuart Caie, CC BY 2.0

    Your DNA holds an incredible amount of information in a very small space. Recently, researchers have looked to DNA as a method to store large amounts of digital information that are currently saved on hard drives. DNA storage has another advantage, too: It can last up to 2,000 years without breaking down, according to recent experiments presented at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, taking place this week, and reported by Hacked.

    Our hard drives may seem pretty stable for now, but because of what they're made of, they will likely break down after just a few decades. As we continue to digitize our history, having a stable way to store this information will become increasingly important—earlier this year, Internet pioneer Vint Cerf warned that, “We are nonchalantly throwing all of our data into what could become an information black hole without realizing it.”

    A team of swiss engineers hope to employ DNA as a method to store more data. Today, our hard drives can store up to five terabytes of data, encoded with the zeros and ones of binary code. But if data were stored in DNA, the four chemical nucleotides (A, C, G, and T) could theoretically hold up to 300,000 terabytes. The researchers also wanted to see if the DNA would be able to retain information longer than a hard drive does now (which is about a few decades). They encoded DNA with 83 kilobytes of text written in the 13th and 10th centuries. They stored the DNA in silica spheres to protect it, and then warmed it to 160 degrees Fahrenheit for a week—the equivalent of keeping it at 50 degrees for 2,000 years. When the researchers decoded the DNA, they found no errors, indicating that the DNA held up well and the information they encoded stayed intact.

    It’s not likely that your next computer will store your data in DNA. It’s still prohibitively expensive, and there’s no system to search and archive the information—something the Swiss researchers plan to look into in the near future. But digital archives may start using DNA sooner than you think; it no longer makes sense to throw our digitized cultural documents into an informational black hole.


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    A chart showing that Western Digital hard drives have the highest failure rate of those Backblaze used in their servers.

    A new analysis points fingers

    These Are The Hard Drives Most Likely To Fail…

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    Bringing the nation's recordkeeping strategy out of the WWII era and onto computers

    Despite this era's amazing advances in data storage and data mining, the accumulated records of our federal bureaucracy are largely — and perhaps unsurprisingly — languishing…
    Despite this era's amazing advances in data storage and data mining, the accumulated records of our federal bureaucracy are largely — and perhaps unsurprisingly —…

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    It’s good smoked, straight up on the grill with a little lemon and butter, or rolled into sushi. And now, thanks to researchers at Taiwan’s Tsing Hua University and the…
    It’s good smoked, straight up on the grill with a little lemon and butter, or rolled into sushi. And now, thanks to researchers at Taiwan’s Tsing Hua University and the…

    0 0

    The world’s smallest magnetic data storage unit is made of just 12 atoms, squeezing an entire byte into just 96 atoms, a significant shrinkage in the world of information…
    The world’s smallest magnetic data storage unit is made of just 12 atoms, squeezing an entire byte into just 96 atoms, a significant shrinkage in the world of…

    0 0

    An international team of researchers claims to have figured out a way to use ultrafast bursts of heat, rather than the typical magnetic field, to record a bit of information…
    An international team of researchers claims to have figured out a way to use ultrafast bursts of heat, rather than the typical magnetic field, to record a bit of…

    0 0

    DNA is the blueprint for life, and now it can serve as a computer to monitor life’s processes. Bioengineers transformed DNA into a one-bit memory system that can record,…
    DNA is the blueprint for life, and now it can serve as a computer to monitor life’s processes. Bioengineers transformed DNA into a one-bit memory system that can record,…

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    1. Engrave it on a piece of platinum. 2. Bury the platinum in the desert.

    Despite claims to the contrary, the storage media in wide use today—CD-ROMs, spinning hard drives, flash memory, etc.—aren’t very durable. “You’re talking years, not…

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    Stop throwing all your data into a digital black hole

    Your DNA holds an incredible amount of information in a very small space. Recently, researchers have looked to DNA as a method to store large amounts of digital information…

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    A chart showing that Western Digital hard drives have the highest failure rate of those Backblaze used in their servers.

    A new analysis points fingers

    These Are The Hard Drives Most Likely To Fail…

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    data storage

    Researchers stored an operating system and a short movie on DNA

    With a special coding technique, DNA data storage is 60% more efficient and is quite robust.

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    Trash

    Send your trash beyond the point of no return.

    Just moving a digital file to the trash bin won't get rid of it. Want to make sure your data is gone forever? Here's what to do on computers, tablets, and phones.

older | 1 | (Page 2)